Resort

Outdoor activities are not supervised. They are intended for both fishing and non-fishing guests.

Ecotourism and Visit of the Region

Situated between the islands of the Watshishou sanctuary, meaning white or shiny mountain in Montagnais, Baie-Johan-Beetz is a rocky world, most often deprived of vegetation and where countless mini fjords nestle seabirds colonies, such as the eiders who sometimes loiter on the shore in the middle of the village.

Called the North Coast’s jewelry, Baie-Johan-Beetz is a perfect site for the identification of rocks and minerals. A simple hike leads you to the Piashti River falls. Also at the agenda, the picking and collecting of shellfishes and berries, such as cranberry, that can be found everywhere. The cloudberry and lingonberry (red seeds) are also collected for commercial production of fine liquors by the SAQ.

Discover the archipelago and the maritime region on a sea touring kayak. You can use your own kayak to do so, or rent company services or a private guide at Havre Saint Pierre.

Also make sure to visit the surroundings of Natashquan, 88 km from Baie-Johan-Beetz, and of Havre Saint Pierre (Îles Mingan), 66 km from our site.

Even if you stay on our site, you can enjoy the beauty of the wilderness and the renowned conviviality of the North Coast people.

Observation of Birds

The oldest banding station in Quebec, founded in 1949 at Lac Salé, was closed in 2004. Every year, from 15 August to the end of September, American Black Ducks and Green Winged Teals were banded there. Year after year, the station was the holder of the North-American record for the highest concentration of Green-winged Teals. Another continental record was obtained in the region by the deceased Phidelem Harvey, who banded more than 24,000 birds.

It is therefore useless to sing the praises of this site as a privileged spot for birding, being a distinctive place in the migration corridor, and for the Watshishou river’s achipelago, a genuine sanctuary where you can find the largest diversity of seabirds.